How do you use Statistical Models to Forecast Sales?

Sales and demand forecasters have a variety of techniques at their disposal to predict the future. While most analysts will examine historical sales or other kinds of data as a guide, many forecasters rely heavily on judgment. There’s no question that judgment can (and probably should!) play a significant role in arriving at your final, consensus forecast–but statistical forecasting can offer a level of automation and insight that can substantially improve your forecast accuracy, particularly when you are producing large quantities of forecasts on a rolling basis.

This article covers two common approaches for forecasting sales using statistical methods: time series models and regression models. The advantage of these approaches is that they offer a lot of “bang for your buck”. On one hand, they are robust methods that can detect and extrapolate on patterns in your data like seasonality, sales cycles, trends, responses to promotions, and so on. On the other hand, they are easily accessible approaches, especially with the right tools.

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What are Time Series Methods and When Should I Use Them?

101cTime series methods are forecasting techniques that base the forecast solely on the demand history of the item you are forecasting. They work by capturing patterns in the historical data and extrapolating those patterns into the future. Time series methods are appropriate when you can assume a reasonable amount of continuity between the past and the future. They are best suited to shorter-term forecasting (say 18 months or less). This is due to their assumption that future patterns and trends will resemble current patterns and trends. This is a reasonable assumption in the short term but becomes more tenuous the further out you forecast.

time series forecast

A Time Series Forecast

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Terms Every Forecaster Should Know

101cForecasting is a dynamic and interdisciplinary field that involves a multitude of people, processes and techniques. Forecasters are constantly building on their current pool of knowledge in order to improve their processes, drawing on whatever resources they can find. A forecaster’s best resource, however, is often other forecasters—but it can be difficult to share information if everyone is speaking a different language. For this post we’ve compiled and defined a list of terms that every forecaster should be familiar with. Continue reading